Writeup_when the water comes.jpg
 A room breaks off intact onto the sand  in Saint-Louis, Senegal. Most homes on the waterfront have been destroyed as the crashing waves  take more of the sand that buoys the foundations

A room breaks off intact onto the sand in Saint-Louis, Senegal. Most homes on the waterfront have been destroyed as the crashing waves take more of the sand that buoys the foundations

 Fatou Ngueye sits in the remains of her living room with 5 of her children. They-along with her husband- have been sleeping on the floor at a neighbors home for over a year.

Fatou Ngueye sits in the remains of her living room with 5 of her children. They-along with her husband- have been sleeping on the floor at a neighbors home for over a year.

CoastalErosion_IMG_3486.jpg
 A child plays on the ruins left by the ocean surge.  Saint Louis, Senegal

A child plays on the ruins left by the ocean surge.

Saint Louis, Senegal

CoastalErosion_IMG_3796.jpg
 The arid area where the fishermen and their families have been relocated, is not connected to any water lines.   Here, residents collect water that is brought in via carted mule.

The arid area where the fishermen and their families have been relocated, is not connected to any water lines.

Here, residents collect water that is brought in via carted mule.

 Mari Taw, 58 years old. She has 8 children, 5 of whom are fishermen.  The most difficult aspect of living in the tent city for her, is the flooding that occurs as the tents are set on arid land that doesn’t absorb the rain water.  Khar Yalla  Senegal

Mari Taw, 58 years old. She has 8 children, 5 of whom are fishermen. The most difficult aspect of living in the tent city for her, is the flooding that occurs as the tents are set on arid land that doesn’t absorb the rain water.

Khar Yalla

Senegal

 An abandoned school in Doun Baba Dièye, Senegal. The area was completely submerged in 2009, so residents were forced to move inland

An abandoned school in Doun Baba Dièye, Senegal. The area was completely submerged in 2009, so residents were forced to move inland

 Babacar Diop, 42, still lives in the remains of his house though the front rooms have fallen down. He prefers to stay here even with the danger as it is the only home he’s ever known.

Babacar Diop, 42, still lives in the remains of his house though the front rooms have fallen down. He prefers to stay here even with the danger as it is the only home he’s ever known.

 A man sits under a boat for shade. With rising sea temperatures it is harder and harder to find fish close to shore. Nowadays fishermen must go out for a days at a time before they are able to haul a good catch.

A man sits under a boat for shade. With rising sea temperatures it is harder and harder to find fish close to shore. Nowadays fishermen must go out for a days at a time before they are able to haul a good catch.

 The local cemetery which has stood for more than 100 years, is also flooding.  Saint Louis, Senegal

The local cemetery which has stood for more than 100 years, is also flooding.

Saint Louis, Senegal

 The remains of a house in Saint Louis, Senegal

The remains of a house in Saint Louis, Senegal

 The Senegalese government has started to keep track of the crumbling properties on the Saint Louis coast with a series of personalized numbers. When the families ask for relocation assistance they are identified by these numbers.     Saint Louis, Senegal

The Senegalese government has started to keep track of the crumbling properties on the Saint Louis coast with a series of personalized numbers. When the families ask for relocation assistance they are identified by these numbers.

Saint Louis, Senegal

 Families who lost their home due to the coastal erosion in Saint Louis, have been relocated to this tent area provided by the French government. Pictured here, Adama Tall, with her mother and son who has severe bronchial problems. The air in the tent gets very hot which adds to his medical issues and needs for medications after moving to Khar Yalla tent camp.

Families who lost their home due to the coastal erosion in Saint Louis, have been relocated to this tent area provided by the French government. Pictured here, Adama Tall, with her mother and son who has severe bronchial problems. The air in the tent gets very hot which adds to his medical issues and needs for medications after moving to Khar Yalla tent camp.

 Children play near a building abandoned due to the rising water

Children play near a building abandoned due to the rising water

 Doun Baba Dieye was a village of fishermen, farmers and cattle people south of Saint-Louis. Here, due to the channel that Senegalese authorities dug, the floodwaters swelled to the point that villagers were forced to move inland abandoning their homes. Pictured here, the former center of town.

Doun Baba Dieye was a village of fishermen, farmers and cattle people south of Saint-Louis. Here, due to the channel that Senegalese authorities dug, the floodwaters swelled to the point that villagers were forced to move inland abandoning their homes. Pictured here, the former center of town.

 Baye Niang comes from many generations of fishermen. He himself fished for nearly 40 years though now his son captains the boat. The major difference he recounts is that instead of going out for a single day to find fish, now it takes closer to one week -with the boat going 20 km out- before they can find a catch.

Baye Niang comes from many generations of fishermen. He himself fished for nearly 40 years though now his son captains the boat. The major difference he recounts is that instead of going out for a single day to find fish, now it takes closer to one week -with the boat going 20 km out- before they can find a catch.

 Residents of Doun Baba Dieye, a village that is now completely submerged due to rising waters. The entire village moved inland in 2009.

Residents of Doun Baba Dieye, a village that is now completely submerged due to rising waters. The entire village moved inland in 2009.

 Empty coolers that are used to store fish. For the last few years the fishermens yield as been in steady decline

Empty coolers that are used to store fish. For the last few years the fishermens yield as been in steady decline

 Saint Louis, Senegal fishing boats

Saint Louis, Senegal fishing boats

Writeup_when the water comes.jpg
 A room breaks off intact onto the sand  in Saint-Louis, Senegal. Most homes on the waterfront have been destroyed as the crashing waves  take more of the sand that buoys the foundations
 Fatou Ngueye sits in the remains of her living room with 5 of her children. They-along with her husband- have been sleeping on the floor at a neighbors home for over a year.
CoastalErosion_IMG_3486.jpg
 A child plays on the ruins left by the ocean surge.  Saint Louis, Senegal
CoastalErosion_IMG_3796.jpg
 The arid area where the fishermen and their families have been relocated, is not connected to any water lines.   Here, residents collect water that is brought in via carted mule.
 Mari Taw, 58 years old. She has 8 children, 5 of whom are fishermen.  The most difficult aspect of living in the tent city for her, is the flooding that occurs as the tents are set on arid land that doesn’t absorb the rain water.  Khar Yalla  Senegal
 An abandoned school in Doun Baba Dièye, Senegal. The area was completely submerged in 2009, so residents were forced to move inland
 Babacar Diop, 42, still lives in the remains of his house though the front rooms have fallen down. He prefers to stay here even with the danger as it is the only home he’s ever known.
 A man sits under a boat for shade. With rising sea temperatures it is harder and harder to find fish close to shore. Nowadays fishermen must go out for a days at a time before they are able to haul a good catch.
 The local cemetery which has stood for more than 100 years, is also flooding.  Saint Louis, Senegal
 The remains of a house in Saint Louis, Senegal
 The Senegalese government has started to keep track of the crumbling properties on the Saint Louis coast with a series of personalized numbers. When the families ask for relocation assistance they are identified by these numbers.     Saint Louis, Senegal
 Families who lost their home due to the coastal erosion in Saint Louis, have been relocated to this tent area provided by the French government. Pictured here, Adama Tall, with her mother and son who has severe bronchial problems. The air in the tent gets very hot which adds to his medical issues and needs for medications after moving to Khar Yalla tent camp.
 Children play near a building abandoned due to the rising water
 Doun Baba Dieye was a village of fishermen, farmers and cattle people south of Saint-Louis. Here, due to the channel that Senegalese authorities dug, the floodwaters swelled to the point that villagers were forced to move inland abandoning their homes. Pictured here, the former center of town.
 Baye Niang comes from many generations of fishermen. He himself fished for nearly 40 years though now his son captains the boat. The major difference he recounts is that instead of going out for a single day to find fish, now it takes closer to one week -with the boat going 20 km out- before they can find a catch.
 Residents of Doun Baba Dieye, a village that is now completely submerged due to rising waters. The entire village moved inland in 2009.
 Empty coolers that are used to store fish. For the last few years the fishermens yield as been in steady decline
 Saint Louis, Senegal fishing boats

A room breaks off intact onto the sand in Saint-Louis, Senegal. Most homes on the waterfront have been destroyed as the crashing waves take more of the sand that buoys the foundations

Fatou Ngueye sits in the remains of her living room with 5 of her children. They-along with her husband- have been sleeping on the floor at a neighbors home for over a year.

A child plays on the ruins left by the ocean surge.

Saint Louis, Senegal

The arid area where the fishermen and their families have been relocated, is not connected to any water lines.

Here, residents collect water that is brought in via carted mule.

Mari Taw, 58 years old. She has 8 children, 5 of whom are fishermen. The most difficult aspect of living in the tent city for her, is the flooding that occurs as the tents are set on arid land that doesn’t absorb the rain water.

Khar Yalla

Senegal

An abandoned school in Doun Baba Dièye, Senegal. The area was completely submerged in 2009, so residents were forced to move inland

Babacar Diop, 42, still lives in the remains of his house though the front rooms have fallen down. He prefers to stay here even with the danger as it is the only home he’s ever known.

A man sits under a boat for shade. With rising sea temperatures it is harder and harder to find fish close to shore. Nowadays fishermen must go out for a days at a time before they are able to haul a good catch.

The local cemetery which has stood for more than 100 years, is also flooding.

Saint Louis, Senegal

The remains of a house in Saint Louis, Senegal

The Senegalese government has started to keep track of the crumbling properties on the Saint Louis coast with a series of personalized numbers. When the families ask for relocation assistance they are identified by these numbers.

Saint Louis, Senegal

Families who lost their home due to the coastal erosion in Saint Louis, have been relocated to this tent area provided by the French government. Pictured here, Adama Tall, with her mother and son who has severe bronchial problems. The air in the tent gets very hot which adds to his medical issues and needs for medications after moving to Khar Yalla tent camp.

Children play near a building abandoned due to the rising water

Doun Baba Dieye was a village of fishermen, farmers and cattle people south of Saint-Louis. Here, due to the channel that Senegalese authorities dug, the floodwaters swelled to the point that villagers were forced to move inland abandoning their homes. Pictured here, the former center of town.

Baye Niang comes from many generations of fishermen. He himself fished for nearly 40 years though now his son captains the boat. The major difference he recounts is that instead of going out for a single day to find fish, now it takes closer to one week -with the boat going 20 km out- before they can find a catch.

Residents of Doun Baba Dieye, a village that is now completely submerged due to rising waters. The entire village moved inland in 2009.

Empty coolers that are used to store fish. For the last few years the fishermens yield as been in steady decline

Saint Louis, Senegal fishing boats

show thumbnails